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Posts Tagged ‘landscape’

Finally I’ve finished another painting! This winter has been brutal in every way imaginable. Because of this I’ve taken to painting dreamy summer scenes all season to console my shivering skins.

Last summer I took a trip to P-Town Mass, early in the season before the crowds arrived.  The town was just waking up from its long winter slumber; the people and their possessions were slowly and lazily stirring with anticipation for the coming tourist season. Things weren’t ready yet–boats had to be hosed off, patios needed to be set-up. Everything was being taken outside and given a good shake. Provincetown is a very beautiful place, but it’s a tourist town and beautiful places are hard to appreciate when you can’t see the scenery through masses of human bodies in colorful hats and cheap backpacks. It was nice to get a glimpse of the famous local when it’s most mundane, where the most exciting thing happening is that the library is being dusted and the sidewalks refinished. It really is a cute little town.
provincetownwatermark

This painting was done in watercolors and pen on cold-press watercolor paper. I’m most proud of how that tree turned out.

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After spending Spring break 2012 in Sicily as part of a travel & art class at University of Hartford, I came back to the United States ready to make artwork about what struck me most during my time abroad. I am extremely proud of these three paintings. They can be viewed larger in the color illustration gallery.

My work is about the relationship between the Island of Sicily and the inhabitants that have shaped and changed the face of the island overtime in order to live, grow, and worship there. Sicily is a land of abundant natural beauty that spills over the hills and cliffs in the form of brightly colored volcanic stone and sedimentation, and densely textured, luscious foliage that springs from the fertile soil. With so much potential in the ground, the Island has passed through the hands of many cultures over the millennia, all of which have shaped and tamed the Island to fit their needs without ever covering up the Island’s natural beauty.

In other parts of the modern world, the United States included, too much is done to pave over nature and replace it with sterile modern comforts. In these places the dialogue with the earth is lost. In Sicily, they use the earth without ever losing sight of it, and there is a respect for the permanence, strength, and life-giving qualities of stone. It is the delicate influence of man over nature that produces some of the most beautiful sites on the island, where man attempts to manicure the land’s raw potential, and turn it into something that will feed his stomach, nourish his soul, and shield him from the elements.

This series of watercolors is a depiction of those three basic and universal human needs which are met through collaboration with the earth. The pursuit to feed oneself and ones family is seen in the farms and orchards that blanket the volcanic hills which make this growth possible. The quest to live comfortably, shielded from the wind, rain, and cold can be seen in the stone apartments that rise out of the ground. The need to worship and feel apart of a community is literally carved from the Island in the form of temples that span the ages.

The physical earth of Sicily is a connective tissue that links and satisfies all of man’s needs; it links individuals to communities, past to present, and mortals to their gods. When all aspects of life are tied together through a connection to the earth, that is when life is most beautiful, and it is a feeling that I would like to remember.

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